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, the ambassador who was killed on the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi two nights ago. christopher stevens was an arabic speaker, a longtime student of libya. he had lived in the kuchb country on and off for a long time. he understood the country well. in 2008 he wrote what in retrospect now seems to be an important and chilling memo about this particular place in libya. see, we'll show you. this is where libya is on the map of north africa. see libya sort of juts into the mediterranean at two different points, on the west side and on the east side. on the western side there, you see is tripoli. that is the capital of libya. but it is way over on the other peninsula on the right on the eastern part of the country where the city of benghazi is located. this place that christopher stevens, our ambassador who was just killed, the place he wrote about in 2008 in this cable that was uncovered by wikileaks, it's right there next to benghazi, the city of derna. in order to understand how it is we just had an ambassador murdered, it's worth knowing what the ambassador had to say about this flas pl
killed in tuesday's attack in benghazi, libya. meantime angry protests spread today throughout the muslim world including jerusalem and the west bank along gaza. u.n. peacekeepers were also attacked by protesters. no casualties reported. in tunisia protesters stormed the u.s. embassy setting fires and battling with tunisian security forces. two people were killed. another 29 injured. in all protests broke out today in at least 17 nations from north africa across the middle east to indonesia. all the demonstrators voicing outrage against that film made in the united states that ridicules the prophet mohammed. nbc's jim maceda is in that country. we hope to have him join us later. joining me now, andrea mitchell, most of "andrea mitchell reports," andrea i'll start off with you. the ceremony you were talking about when bodies were returned after the attacks on the embassy in 1998 you were there. this is something that many people in my generation never witnessed and never seen in our lifetimes. an ambassador his remains and those of his colleagues brought back in this country. >> it is the
developments in the attacks on u.s. facilities in both cairo, egypt. and benghazi, libya. u.s. sources now tell cnn the attack in benghazi was actually planned in advance and the perpetrators used a protest outside the u.s. consulate in benghazi there simply as a diversion. four americans died including the united states ambassador to libya chris stevens. our foreign affairs correspondent, jill dougherty, has been working her sources to get a better idea on exactly what happened. our senior international correspondent nic robertson is monitoring the search for who's responsible. and our pentagon correspondent chris lawrence is keeping tabs on the u.s. military's response to what's going on as well. let's go to jill first. she's watching what's going on. jill, what's the latest over at the state department beyond the heartbreak of a top u.s. diplomat, three others killed? >> right, wolf. just in a few minutes we're expecting an update, a briefing on background by senior officials here at the state department. but for now this is what we know based on the conversations and what we are hearing fro
deny what happened in benghazi was a terrorist attack with press secretary jay carney saying yesterday every step of the way the information that we have provided to you and the general public about the attack in benghazi has been based on the best intelligence we've had and the assessments of our intelligence community. carney also told reporters even though the president still not publicly called this a terrorist attack, since he is are obama's spokesman, and he gave it that label we should all know what the commander-in-chief thinks it was. bill: so now we're hearing from democrats who demand answers from the administration. what are they saying, peter? >> reporter: 10 democrats and nine republicans on the senate foreign relations committee chaired by democrat john kerry wrote the state department, they want to know if the u.s. had any intelligence a possible attack and if security forces assigned to our missions were well-equipped and what the forces did to protect personnel when they came under fire. one republican on the committee says the story right now just does not add up. >>
americans, including the u.s. ambassador to libya. our nbc reporter is in benghazi as police close in on the consulate attackers. >> reporter: a team of fbi investigators has arrived here in benghazi. they're gogt to now begin sifting through the rebel and ashes at the u.s. consulate to identify any clues or evidence that may help them in identifying who is behind the attack that killed the u.s. ambassador and three other americans. we also understand that the libyan government for their part is cooperating with the u.s. intelligence agencies and other agencies involved in the investigation. the libyan government believes that this was a preplanned attack, that this was not a spontaneous outburst of violence as some have suggested. so far they have four individuals in their custody. they say several more are under surveillance. they are trying to see whether these individuals have any important information that can benefit the american investigation. meanwhile, u.s. intelligence assets including unmanned aerial drones are keeping an eye above the skies of benghazi and eavesdropping
consulate in benghazi was a deliberate and organized terrorist assault carried out by extremists affiliated or sympathetic with al qaeda, a flat statement just issued. let's discuss the political fallout in our strategy session. joining us now, the democratic strategist and cnn political contributor donna brazile, along with david frum, contributing editor at "the daily beast" and "newsweek." david, a powerful statement just released by the director of national intelligence. it totally contradicts what the administration was saying in the days that immediately followed the killing of ambassador stevens and the three other americans. what do you make of this? >> totally supports what my colleague reported three days ago who was the first with this story. what it makes is the american ambassador dead, the administration's first impulse was to find ways to cover itself and avoid acknowledging the mistake the ambassador had completely inadequate security in a dangerous place. and it did that by pitting on this youtube video of the maker on his way to prison and charged under other offenses. in
at the consulate in benghazi. secretary of state hillary clinton was scheduled to testify to congress in a closed intelligence briefing today. it's been suggested the u.s. was warned about that attack in libya three days before it happened. the administration insists they haven't seen intelligence about "significant advanced planning" for that attack. but interestingly the white house is now calling the deadly assault on the u.s. consulate in benghazi a terrorist attack for the first time. and it happened on the anniversary of 9/11. fancy that. u.s. relations with israel at least on the surface appear to be getting much worse as president obama continues to say he doesn't have time to meet with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. iran continues to march toward nuclear weapons. syria continues to murder its own people. it all suddenly feels much worse than it has for some time. here's the question, how satisfied are you with u.s. policy in the middle east? go to cnn.com/caffertyfile. post a comment. or go to our post on "the situation room" facebook page. wolf. >> jack, thank you. >>> meanw
developing news right now. we go benghazi, libya where the u.s. government is making a big push to investigate the killing of the u.s. annual bass door and three deaths there earlier this week. the libya president had will this to say when asked who was behind the attack. >> we have assumptions. we have some information.o say d the attack. >> we have assumptions. we have some information.say wh the attack. >> we have assumptions. we have some information. and on that information that we have, we will go after the perpetrators. >> ayman is on the phone with us. what else did the libya president have to say? >> reporter: well, really programs the most interesting information that came out about those perpetrators was that they are not all libyan and that certainly comes as a surprise. one of the things that he said was that the information the libyan authorities have is that in fact foreigners were involved in the planning and execution of this attack. and one of the reasons that comes as a huge surprise to many is that while the libyan government has struggled to establish law an
. the powder keg is still conserving its powder, it seems. ironical ironically, benghazi remained pretty calm, perhaps the libyan government's quick crack down on perpetrators, a number have been arrested already. there's a man hunt going on if you believe what you hear from the libyan government. that's perhaps had an affect on tamping down the tension in benghazi. but the u.s. government's taking no chances. all u.s. diplomatic personnel evacuated to tripoli and only emergency staff being kept on at the embassy in the capital. as you mentioned in cairo, it's been another -- on the third day of protests -- another active day but not a lot of death -- no deaths spo-to-speak of. not too many people have been injured. so perhaps a second degree level of violence. overnight dramatic scenes near the u.s. embassy, which is about 500 yards behind me down the road next to the mosque, riot police charging forward, firing tear gas, trying in vain to disperse a crowd. this cat and mouse stand-off went on all day today. expecting to see it again later on. now the biggest concern, as you alluded to, is t
of four americans at the u.s. embassy in benghazi. the libyan city america helped free from the oppressive regime of moammar gadhafi. chris stevens was among the americans killed after protesters stormed the embassy last night. demonstrators also swarmed the u.s. embassy in cairo, scaling the walls and tearing apart the american flag. the attacks are believed to be in reaction to a obscure movie film in the u.s. by an israeli citizen one that ridicules islam and the prophet mohammed. today, flags at the capitol have been lowered to half mast and the president spoke earlier in the rose garden addressing the tragedy. >> the united states condemns in the strongest terms this outrageous and shocking attack. since our founding, the united states has been a nation that respects all faiths. we reject all efforts to denigrate the religious beliefs of others. but there is absolutely no justification to this type of senseless violence. none. >> not content to sit on the sidelines at a critical moment in his presidential campaign, governor mitt romney plunged himself into the middle of this developin
definitive conclusions. our assessment at the present is in fact it began spontaneously in benghazi as a reaction to what had transpired hours earlier in cairo where, of course, as you know, there was a violent protest outside of our embassy sparked by this hateful video. but soon after that spontaneous protest began outside of our consulate in benghazi, we believe that it looks like extremist elements, individuals, joined in that effort with heavy weapons of the sort that are, unfortunately, readily now available in libya post-revolution. and that it spun from there into something much, much more violent. >> schieffer: but you do not agree with him that this was something that had been plotted out several months ago? >> we do not-- we do not have information at present that leads us to conclude this was premeditated or preplanned. >> schieffer: do you agree or disagree with him that al qaeda had some part in this? >> well, we'll have to find out that out. i think it's clear there were extremist elements that joined in and escalated the violence. whether they were al qaeda affiliate
happened in benghazi, the fbi can't get within 400 miles there to examine the evidence which is already being destroyed, so it's going to be hard to make a case. what about this letter that you have sent asking for answers about what went wrong in benghazi? >> well i have the letter here with me. i could show it to you. i wouldn't change anything. let me be crystal clear as chairman of that committee, and i hope this gets out to other people who are listening about this. >> and i should point out i've got the letter here too. we've gone through it. >> republicans are working overtime to try to exploit a very normal, run of the course, admin strative letter that we agreed to on a bipartisan basis in our committee, simply to get some additional questions put in front of the state department that are part of their already existing investigation. this is not a challenge. it is nothing new. it is not something out of the ordinary. and i agreed to do it as a matter of bipartisanship because we thought these were important questions that people ought to be examining. >> but aren't you concerne
on at the consulate in benghazi, and this attack appears to have been planned. it appears to have been a real effort by some organized groups. that is quite different from what we have seen so far. in cairo, it seems much more spontaneous, and the government has not condemned the demonstrations there as clearly as the government in libya has. the president in libya apologized unequivocally about what happened. ambassador stevens was extremely well-liked by and libya. this situation in egypt is much more popular resentment to the united states. in yemen, there's also popular resentment to the united states for the ongoing drone war, if i can put it that way. so you have quite different situations in the different countries, hard to tell how all of this is going to involve. it is not common ground yet, and i do not expect a common ground. we have yet to see demonstrations in afghanistan and other muslim countries and i suspect we will. host: we spoke with a reporter from the "l.a. times" this morning who was in cairo. he said cairo was calm and that he felt safe, that it was a lot of political theater
consulate in benghazi a huge tragedy and says the libyan people lost a great friend in ambassador chris stevens. the remarks from libya's president comes as his government tries to rein in the power of various rebel groups that helped topple dictator muammar qaddafi. this development won't help. one of the libyan rebels that helped capture the dictator has been killed. the his relatives say he was tortured and shot in a rival town. now they threatening revenge. greg palkot streaming live from tripoli. >> reporter: jon, those close to the former rebel say he was killed by a qaddafi loyalist and they want action as a sign how unsettled things are. regarding that crackdown on militias we're getting signs it could be working. we've been seeing compounds here in tripoli where libyan security forces moved in forcing out militants. our contact in benghazi says that a key militia there appears to be going under government control. there are still many others here who say the extremist militants, some who might be tied to that consulate attack, are simply going underground taking some very dange
of the americans killed in the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya on tuesday. back to the funds, cumberland, kentucky, our line for democrats. caller: first of all, i appreciate the servicemen we lost and god bless them and their families. in the bush years, it was nothing but terror. that is all you saw on the news. it seems to me that obama is just trying a different way. like egypt, it is a new government and he is trying to give them a chance. i would like to know what you think about that. is it right to give him a chance? host: what do you think? what kind of a chance you give them and how long? caller: i would not really know that. the republican party is ready to yank everything out. it takes time to get a new government going. host: the lead editorial in this morning's "washington post" -- back to the phones, atlanta, georgia, our line for independences. caller: thank you. as far as the two candidates go, from everything i have seen so far, i am not impressed with either one of them. neither of them really inspire confidence with me. that they can handle what is going o
in the benghazi consulate attack returning home to u.s. soil. last night the senate pass add resolution honoring the victims calling their deaths unacceptable and unjust find. meanwhile two navy warships are being positioned off libya's coast. president obama telling libya's president that the country must help the u.s. keep americans there safe. anti-american demonstrators have spread to tunisia and gaza. we will be joined by nbc's intrepid richard engel from cairo in a couple minutes. >>> at 8:35 eastern we eel talk about stability in the middle east with senator john mccain who was close with ambassador chris stevens. >>> apple shares bouncing around after ceo tim cook unveiled the iphone 5. thinner, lighter, features a bigger screen and made entirely of glass and aluminum. in the last hour of squawk, we spoke to brian marshal of isi group and asked him about the user experience. >> the actual product came in very similar to what we're expecting. when i touched the iphone 5, had it in my hands and got to play around with it, i was blown away. once you get it in your hands you'll feel much dif
in massachusetts. glen doherty was killed september 11th in libya in that attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. he was providing security at the time, and the u.s. ambassador to libya was also killed in the attack. >>> for the first time 350,000 chicago public school students are back in the classroom. tuesday the teachers union voted to suspend the strike that kept them out of school. the negotiations for the new contract lasted for several days and the deal must be ratified now by union members. >>> bank of america has not explained the reason behind a problem with the website. and a big problem, because the site was slow or not available to many users yesterday. a bank spokesperson says that they are working to ensure full availability. >>> today, we could finally learn more about fast and furious, the controversial gus trafficking investigation connect n connected to the death of a u.s. border patrol agent. the bureau of tobacco and alcohol and firearms program was to track guns purchase ed d in united states by low level drug dealers and then ended up in the hands of drug cartels in mexic
is stand back. for example, after the attack on the benghazi consulate that the right thing to do is you say nothing because when an american ambassador is killed, that probably indicates that some serious mistake happened. that's a good moment to say nothing and to wait for facts to emerge. this president has a record that is difficult to defend in a lot of respects. job creation, bad, economic growth, too slow. and his foreign policy initiative looks like it is going up in flames. that's the place where mitt romney should go. and of course president obama and his team wake up every morning and say how can we make today be about anything other than that? unfortunately so far they're doing pretty well. >> you know, i think this president has a tremendous record to go out there and tell the american people. stabilizing the economy, 30 months of consecutive job growth, bin laden dead, gadhafi gone, al qaeda weakened. look, we shouldn't run this election on the republican terms. nor should president obama have to respond every time mitt romney makes a mistake and try to prop him up. mitt ro
. in libya, gaddafi was threatening to kill 10,000 people in benghazi, we helped to stabilize that militarily and certainly removed gaddafi. in syria 20,000 people have been killed and certainly, it's difficult to contrast the differences there, why we're not even providing the weapons that the rebels are asking for to help assist them with dealing with the assad regime. >> alisyn: what does american exceptionali exceptionalism, the term, mean to you? >> well, to me, first and foremost, it draws from our constitution, you know, where we're giving rights. as a result of that, the role of government is subordinate to the people. and out of that grew a love for freedom and those rights in the united states of america. and we care so much about them that we're willing to protect other people's rights around the world and we stand for that and it's about leadership. and it's a the a time now when other countries in the world, more and more of them are not willing to step up. you saw that at the end of the 20th of the century, when milosevic, no one was lifting a finger. 250,000 were killed until a
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)